Sep 262014

Even as I sort of talk about the notion of community, though, I think that it’s important to problematize that emphasis because it suggests a homogeneity that may inadvertently exclude other voices or presume that a gender issue isn’t also a race issue, a class issue, a sexuality issue. So I think it’s very important even as we sort of try to come together and be advocates and change agents to really use this conference through venues such as the gender caucus tomorrow and the race caucus a little later this afternoon to problematize and not presume that everyone feels included—that we’re one big happy family. Because that’s not realistic. Every community operates within a system of power, and who feels enabled by that, and who feels disenfranchised? — Kris Blair

Telephone operator and switchboard, Kalamazoo, Michigan. RPPC, Postmarked 1908. Image Credit: Wystan.

Telephone operator and switchboard, Kalamazoo, Michigan. RPPC, Postmarked 1908. Image Credit: Wystan.

Episode 23 is a special compilation of statements collected from this past year’s Computers & Writing in Pullman, WA. Inspired in part by the excellent line of female keynotes (on disability, access, and women in technology fields), the second year of the gender caucus, and a general urgency in the field—and beyond—to discuss what it’s like to be a woman working and researching and teaching in a male-dominated field, we put out a call for women scholars to share their experiences in the field. This podcast features statements from 12 teacher-scholars ranging from graduate students who attended C&W for the first time to women who have actively shaped the field.

To access a PDF of the full transcript, please click here: Transcript for Episode 23

The music sampled in this podcast is “Por Supuesto,” “Blessed,” and “Not the Droid” by Podington Bear, “Homesick” by Keytronic, and “Rain-bow Window” by Diaphane.

May 272014

[T]he danger of [sharing posts] is getting swept up when there’s this frantic information exchange, and you find yourself endorsing values and agendas that you would not normally agree with, and that’s a little bit scary. But I think there’s also potential there. This is not to demonize social media as a site of exchange—I think it has tremendous potential. The question here is how to have meaningful conversations. —Yanira Rodriguez

Image of "The Game Changed in Venezuela Last Night" blog post--shows image of San Cristobal on fire and the first two paragraphs of the post.

“The Game Changed in Venezuela Last Night” via Caracas Chronicles

Episode 22 features a conversation between Ben Kuebrich and Yanira Rodriguez about the representations of the Venezuela protests earlier this year, focusing particularly on how the protests and political situation was represented through the February 20th blog post, “The Game Changed in Venezuela Last Night – and the International Media Is Asleep at the Switch.” Kuebrich and Rodriguez raise questions about international news coverage, the representation and circulation of news on social media, and how we can read news articles more critically.

To access a PDF of the full transcript, please click here: Transcript for Episode 22

The music sampled in this podcast is “As Colorful as Ever” by Broke for Free, “Adventure, Darling” by Gillicuddy, and “Y por qué no hacer una canción de Facebook y cantarla en un camión?”

May 092014

“The ethos of Latina/o Rhetoric is embodied in many of the traditions of resistance that link back to first contact with Europeans in the Americas spanning across time and space to current moments and sites of resistance. Whether it’s the colonialism of Columbus or the neocolonialism of states like Arizona, Latina/o rhetoricians are not lacking in moments of kairos or polemics in the polis that necessitate rhetorical invention to communicate and respond to dominant systems of power.” – Cruz Medina

Fall 2013 cover of Reflections, "Latin@s in Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning"

Episode 21 features a collaboration with the Fall 2013 special issue of Reflections: “Latin@s in Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service-Learning” about how scholars are defining Latina/o rhetorics and why it’s an important issue for the field right now.

To read a PDF of the full transcript, please download it here: Transcript for Episode 21

The music sampled in this podcast is “The Afterlife” by YACHT, “Readers! Do You Read?” by Chris Zabriskie, “Tea Top” by ROW, and “Separate Ways Remix” and “Walking All Day Long” by Willbe.

Apr 232014

A lot of times, contingent faculty do an incredible job of being incredibly professional in unprofessional working conditions. I think that’s the first big cost: the humanity and the economic stability of those folks who are in contingent positions—many of whom are grad students, people who have earned Master’s degrees or Ph.D.s, and obviously made commitments to being in higher education and commitments to wanting to teach and be with students. And, ironically, that group that is often the most committed to teaching—the most committed to being there for students—has to just struggle to be in something that they love to do. — Eileen Schell

Screenshot of our podcast on Present Tense with the text, "Celebrating our 20th episode with Present Tense!"

We’re happy to share a special collaboration with Present Tense: A Journal of Rhetoric in Society for Episode 20! Academic labor is something that greatly concerns us as graduate students, and we think it’s an important concern for both full-time faculty and contingent faculty. That’s why this podcast features the voices of both full-time (Eileen Schell and Tony Scott are both Associate Professors of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University) and contingent faculty (Jeff Simmons is a Professional Writing Instructor at Syracuse University).

To read a PDF of the full transcript, please download it here: Transcript for Episode 20

The music sampled in this podcast is “N35-40-19-800” by Springtide and “Adventure, Darling” and “Multitudes” by Gillicuddy.

Feb 282014

“I’m looking at ways to maybe write the field, to re-write the field, and to continue to write the field. To update it essentially, to continue pushing for its visibility, but to do so in ways that ever so slightly estrange it from—and maybe even estrange it radically in some cases from—the ways it’s been written in the past.” -Derek Mueller

Derek explores networks of discourse made visual by mapping methods.

“map” photo credit zabdiel

Episode 19 features an interview with Derek Mueller on exploring scholarly and discourse networks through text mining and visualization methods that make visible disciplinary patterns and relationships.

To read a PDF of the full transcript, please download it here: Transcript for Episode 19.

The music sampled in this podcast is Chris Zabriskie’s “Readers! Do You Read?,” “Is That You or Are You You?,” and “Mario Bava Sleeps in a Little Later Than He Expected To.”

Feb 072014

I didn’t really want people taking a stance of feeling responsible for racism. We were all born into a system where that preexisted all of us, but to what extent are we accountable for the now?

Black and white image of Ratcliffe standing in front of a crowd, reading from a piece of paper and pointing her finger emphatically. Text reads, "Rhetorical Listening with Krista Ratcliffe."

Krista Ratcliffe presents at the Rhetorical Listening Symposium at Syracuse University, November 13, 2014.

Episode 18 features an interview with Krista Ratcliffe who presented her talk, “Rhetorical Listening: What’s Next?” at the Rhetorical Listening & Composition Colloquium and Workshop Series. In this podcast, Ratcliffe focuses on civic discourse, cultural logics, and how rhetorical listening occurs in the classroom.

To read a PDF of the full transcript, please download it here: Transcript for Episode 18

The music sampled in this podcast is “Horizontal Drift” and “Twinkle Toes Delux” by Jared C Balogh and “Tea Top” by ROW.

Dec 042013

[P]eople say things around you all the time that make you feel like you’re not normal, and so even though people probably look at that, “Well how can you say that you loved a pimp?” Or, “How could you even think that a pimp loved you?” Like I said, people put you in a box and label you, and nobody really is normal. How do we know what that is? What does that mean? We’re all human beings. What does that mean that we’re not normal, you know what I mean? We all feel love, pain, hate. We feel all the things that human beings can feel—jealousy, everything! When you consume that abnormality from the people around you, you believe it. It’s complicated.

Image shows Elaine Richardson dancing--arm outstretched and head turned to the side. Her mouth is open as she sings. Behind her is a projected image of her mother with an accompanying news article.

Elaine Richardson dancing and singing during her one-woman show at Syracuse University, October 17, 2013

Episode 16 features a lively interview with Elaine Richardson who performed her one-woman show based on excerpts from her recent memoir—PHD to PhD: How Education Saved My Lifeat Syracuse University on October 17th. In this interview, she and CCR’s Seth Davis discuss the memoir, African American rhetoric and language diversity, the George Zimmerman trial, and even RuPaul (and his rhetorical agility!).

To read a PDF of the full transcript, please download it here: Transcript for Episode 16. Thanks for listening to This Rhetorical Life.

The music sampled in this podcast is “Lost Tape” by Loopez and “ZootSuit” by Tab & Anitek.

Nov 152013

We want to enact social justice in our classrooms. We try to do this by considering diverse student bodies, incorporating multimodality into our classrooms, developing equitable assessment, and so much more. What about participation and democracy? Even if we value participation and democracy in our classes, what do these concepts look like in reality? And what about the pesky problem of authority? What about the unequal power relations between teacher and student?

A photo of Naeem in dress clothes--white button-down shirt, tie, dark slacks, with a book in his hand, standing in a classroom.

Naeem Inayatullah in the classroom (image via The Ithacan)

Episode 15 features an interview with Naeem Inayatullah, Professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at Ithaca College, who describes his pedagogical approach in the classroom: an approach he describes as Socratic, collective improvisation. This approach is at once radical and reflexive, informed by Lacan and addressing the power inequalities that exist in the classroom.

To read a PDF of the full transcript, please download it here: Episode 15 Transcript

The music sampled in this podcast is “Budgerigar Vishnu” by Vinod Prassana.


Nov 012013

So we’re starting by defining the topic or the term of latina. Who is being included in that? Then we’re looking at questions of who are we going to include? Why are we going to include them? And which works are significant and important in talking about nationalism and feminism?

Image of a sign on a building that reads, "Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies / The Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection"

The Benson Latin American Collection (

Episode 14 features an interview with Cristina Devereaux Ramírez at the 2013 Feminism and Rhetorics Conference at Stanford University. In this episode, Ramírez discusses her upcoming book project Mestiza Rhetoric: Ocupando Nuestro Puesto (Claiming Our Space), an anthology collaboration with Jessica Enoch on Mexican women journalists, and the choices we make as archival researchers about whose voices to include and how these voices can contributely positively not only to the field of rhetoric and composition but also to young latina students.

To read a PDF of the full transcript, please download it here: Transcript for Episode 14

The music sampled in this podcast is “As Colorful as Ever” by Broke for Free and “From Stardust to Sentience” by High Places.